Photo London 2022: Booth #E10

4 - 28 May 2022

During Photo London art fair, we present a curated selection of photographs by Tim Flach, JeeYoung Lee, Jeff Robb, Jan C. Schlegel and Joachim Schmeisser. 

We have created this Reading Room to provide more in-depth information on the artworks displayed.

  • TIM FLACH

    Birds
  • "Birds just present such an array of colors, such different morphologies, I just wanted to explore the wonderment and the beauty of birds."

    Tim Flach

  • Birds

    Tim Flach
  • Tim Flach, Flamboyance, 2021

    Birds

    Tim Flach

    Birds of the world are portrayed in all their colorful glory through a selection of 20 limited editions fine art photographs from his eponymous book recently published by Abrams. Working for years in his studio and in the field, internationally acclaimed photographer Tim Flach has portrayed nature’s most alluring creatures alertly at rest and dramatically in flight, capturing intricate feather patterns and subtle colouration invisible to the naked eye. Radiating grace, intelligence, and humor, and always in motion, birds tantalize the human imagination. Working for years in his studio and the field, Tim Flach has portrayed nature’s most exquisite creatures alertly at rest or dramatically in flight, capturing intricate feather patterns and subtle coloration invisible to the naked eye. From familiar friends to marvelous rarities, Flach’s birds convey the beauty and wonder of the natural world. Here are all manner of songbirds, parrots, and birds of paradise; birds of prey, water birds, and theatrical domestic breeds.

  • Flamboyance, Making of, 2020

    Tim Flach Making-of video of 'Flamboyance', by Tim Flach
  • JEEYOUNG LEE

    Into the Mist
  • "Combining three elements — light, her body, and fog —, she forms a paradoxical scene where fullness and emptiness coexist. The artist calls the viewers to place themselves into the room, creating their very own narrative."

     

    Christina Petridou

     

  • JeeYoung Lee, Salvation, 2020
  • Into the Mist

    Taking a radically opposite approach to her previous aesthetic codes, multidisciplinary artist JeeYoung Lee brings forth a brand new series entitled "Into the Mist". Stripping her studio installations from her usual props and accessories, she immerses herself in an evanescent and vibrating universe close to abstraction. A master of colors in her own right, Lee instinctively expressed her subconsciousness through a single pastel hue and its infinite palette of nuances. Barely perceptible, the outline of her body paradoxically channels her soul to give substance to a visible, almost tangible emotion. 

     

    Inspired by a foggy day spent snowboarding, “Into the Mist” is a (re)collection of the sensations depicted through a series of introspective tableaux. Spiritual, almost mystical, each photograph reactivates a kinesthetic memory which the artist wishes to share with her audience. The physical addresses the immaterial and sublime, while the detail of a movement, a vague reminder of a silhouette, dwells into the viewer’s own sensory hermitage. Like a XXIst century Rothko painting, “Into the Mist” opens up a mental space to let the viewer experience a trip through the infinite perception of the colors of the artist’s soul.

  • JEFF ROBB

    Aperture
  • The world arrested, its motion frozen – it fascinated photographer Eadweard Muybridge in the 1870s. Some 140 years later, the same matter is intriguing three-dimensional artist Jeffrey Robb. Slicing time and movement, Robb however restitutes in a single image, a multiplicity of point of views in the most graceful, light and elastic manner.

    Caught in mid-air, Jeff Robb's models defy gravity. As if freed from earthly constraints, they reinvent the concept of time to infinitely stretch and adapt a fraction of it to our own pace.

  • Jeff Robb, Portal #5, 2020

  • Like for every creative work, it all starts with an idea put down on paper. From the initial ideas Robb...

    Like for every creative work, it all starts with an idea put down on paper. From the initial ideas Robb may pre-visualise potential images using three-dimensional modelling software to produce on-screen prototypes. Soon, this turns into a set building, employing models and using film techniques such as time-lapse photography and green screen compositing.Robb constructs his own cameras and photographic rigs to achieve his unique images. If the subject is moving a number of cameras are used to take photographs simultaneously using a specially designed triggering mechanism.
    The captured frames are processed using software designed for the film industry to achieve the highest quality renderings. These frames are out-put to a laser based writing system that encodes the image onto a photographic substrate. The image is then combined with an optical lens structure to form the final lenticular photographic work, which is finished using a bespoke laser ablation technique.

  • JAN C. SCHLEGEL

  • Jan C. Schlegel, Octopus Vulgaris, 2018
  • On Platinum Printing

    by Jan C. Schlegel

    For people who collect photographs, platinum prints are known for their beauty, archival stability, and unique, one-of-a-kind print statement. Made from the salts of platinum and palladium, these prints are also called “platinotypes” or “platinum prints”. [...] As these emulsions are mixed and coated by hand, no two prints are exactly alike. Each becomes a unique art piece.

    For people who collect photographs, platinum prints are known for their beauty, archival stability, and unique, one-of-a-kind print statement. Made from the salts of platinum and palladium, these prints are also called “platinotypes” or “platinum prints”. Platinum is a noble metal on the periodic table and are resistant to oxidation. The platinum salt emulsion is embedded into the fiber of the paper during the printing process. As with most historical photographic processes, a platinum print is made by placing the negative and emulsion-coated paper in direct contact. Therefore, the size of the photographic print is equal to the size of the negative. 

    Platinum prints have a different “look” from silver gelatin or digital prints. All platinum prints ave a matte surface because the sensitizer is absorbed into the paper rather than sitting on the surface. A platinum print also has a more gradual tonal change from black to white. To the eye accustomed to the punch of a silver gelatin print, a platinum print will often feel “softer” or lower in contrast. In reality, there are actually more steps between pure black and pure white in platinum prints than in a silver gelatin print. This contributes to the deeper, richer feeling you experience when looking at these prints. 

    My platinum prints are made from hand-mixed and hand-coated emulsions. These sensitizers are mixed just prior to use, coated on the paper with a brush. Once dry, a negative is placed in direct contact with the paper, and then exposed to sunlight or ultraviolet light. Exposure to the light source takes an hour or more, depending on the density and contrast of the negative. 

    The image tone of a platinum print can vary in color. These prints can range from a cool, slightly purple black to split tones of brown and warm black, to a very warm brown. The proportions of the different components in the emulsion, choice of developers and the temperature of the developer, control the final color.  Some of my platinum prints are double-layered like Irving Penn did for some of his iconic images. To increase tonality and depth, I also added in some of my images as a second component to the sensitizer: iridium. It makes the picture even more noble and creates more richness in the mid-tones. 

    As these emulsions are mixed and coated by hand, no two prints are exactly alike. Each becomes a unique art piece.

  • Detected positive to Covid in 2021 despite having no symptoms, Jan Schlegel soon realized that he would have to keep...

    Jan C. SchlegelBlack Lily, 2022

    Detected positive to Covid in 2021 despite having no symptoms, Jan Schlegel soon realized that he would have to keep his mind busy while staying home in quarantine. With the flower bouquets of the Vienna's Albertina Museum in mind, which he had visited shortly before, he turned this time into an opportunity. In addition to his platinum prints, he decided to purchase a 8’x10’ Kodak Portra and managed to put his hand on what were probably the very last 15 Polaroids 809, all of which had expired 20 years ago at least.

    Reflecting on the evanescence of life, these unique snapshots illustrate the evolution of the time through the withering process of flowers.

  • JOACHIM SCHMEISSER

    The Last of Their Kind
  • In his series "The Last Of Their Kind", Joachim Schmeisser focuses on the beauty of creation and its fragile transience. These striking images are timeless works that can be interpreted on different levels: as depictions of a distant past or as iconic memories in a not too distant future in which we can only admire these majestic creatures in zoos. They are both an homage and a final warning - visual revelations that sharpen our clouded view of nature in all its infinite complexity as well as recognizing what treasures we might irretrievably lose.

  • Born in Germany in 1958, Joachim Schmeisser is best known for his major photographic series he has done in East...

    Born in Germany in 1958, Joachim Schmeisser is best known for his major photographic series he has done in East Africa – his iconic portraiture of Elephants – especially the Orphan Elephants at the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Kenya.

    He started this project in 2009 and it is still ongoing even today and has become a matter close to his heart. In 2012, Joachim Schmeisser won the prestigious Hasselblad Award for this work. In 2017 his book "Elephants in Heaven" was launched by the German Publisher teNeues and sold out within 4 months.

    His following book, Hall of Giants shows a selection of large-format portraits of some of the oldest and largest bull elephants in Africa as well as young elephants that have the potential to grow into Big Tuskers. All of the photographs were taken with medium-format cameras without the use of remote control devices or long lenses. These close-ups are extremely rare in the genre of wildlife photography. Of the Big Tuskers in Amboseli, they are the only ones that exist in this form.

    His latest release, entitled The Last Of Their Kind, has been published in Spring 2021 by teNeues.

  • Joachim Schmeisser, Beyond II, 2019

    Joachim Schmeisser

    Beyond II, 2019 Archival pigment print
    90 x 190 cm
    35 3/8 x 74 3/4 in
    Edition of 5 plus 2 artist's proofs